Health

Actions on climate change will improve health and save lives now and in the future.Imperial news

Measures to address climate change could have significant benefits to human health not only in the next few years, but also in the long run, the new report said.

Released today, Report The Academy of Medicine and the Royal Society are calling on the UK Government to ensure that the initiatives it has established to address climate change are designed to benefit health.

The report brought together 11 key experts, including: Professor Emeritus Joe Hai When Professor Frank Kelly Review evidence from a variety of sources from Imperial College London on the health effects of initiatives to address climate change.

We hope that the UK Government will seize the opportunities offered by COP26 to demonstrate global leadership and bring health to the forefront of the climate change story. Professor Joanna Hay

If health is at the heart of the climate agenda, the actions taken to reach UK net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 will not only bring short-term benefits to UK human health, but also short-term benefits. We conclude that it helps reduce the risk to health. From global climate change.

Professor Joanna Haigh of Grantham Institute – Climate Change and the Environment at Imperial said: “Climate change poses a devastating threat to humankind and the natural systems that underpin our lives.

“While it is clear that climate change efforts will have a positive impact on human health in the long run, our report shows that the UK has achieved its net zero greenhouse gas emission target by 2050. Many of the actions needed to do this also benefit our health in the short term.

“We hope that the UK Government will seize the opportunities offered by COP26 to demonstrate global leadership and bring health to the forefront of the climate change story.”

Health at the heart of the climate change debate

The report encourages UK policy makers and funders to put health benefits at the center of climate change discussions, debates and actions. The main examples of areas where climate change behavior has a positive impact on health are:

  • Phase abolition of fossil fuels: Switching from fossil fuels to cleaner electricity can reduce air pollution, improve health and save lives. In the UK, air pollution causes 28,000 to 36,000 premature deaths annually, many of which can be prevented by phasing out fossil fuels. The degree of health benefits of moving to Net Zero depends on your energy mix. For example, the significant use of biomass instead of fossil fuels increases air pollution from particulate emissions, reducing the expected health benefits.
  • trip: Domestic transport, primarily from road vehicles, accounts for 27% of UK greenhouse gas emissions. Electric car charging on the streetPublic transport support, increased cycling and walking, and switching to electric vehicles lead to environmental and health benefits from more physical activity and lower air pollution. Increased daily walking and cycling in urban areas of England and Wales, as well as Copenhagen levels, could reduce heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other illnesses and save £ 17 billion in NHS over 20 years. There is sex.
  • Food production and diet: Food production accounts for 23% of UK greenhouse gas emissions. Continuing to reduce UK lean meat consumption while increasing fruit and vegetable consumption will significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and avoid or delay death from heart disease, stroke and cancer. A healthy diet with reduced lean and processed meats and more fruits and vegetables is projected to increase life expectancy by about 8 months and reduce food-related greenhouse emissions by about 17%.
  • building: In 2019, buildings accounted for 17% of UK greenhouse gas emissions. Low temperatures can lead to up to 50,000 deaths annually. Therefore, warmer, more insulated homes should prevent some of these premature deaths and reduce fuel costs. Proper ventilation is also required to ensure indoor air quality and maximize health benefits.
  • Health care: Medical systems around the world account for 4-5% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. Last year, the NHS was the first national health service to promise zero direct emissions by 2040 and zero indirect emissions by 2045.

“Win-Win” action

The report said the impact of climate change mitigation strategies was primarily positive, but could also have unintended negative health consequences.

We need to pay close attention to the international supply chain and economic system that underpins the transition to global net zero. For example, relying on batteries for renewable energy means that more cobalt needs to be mined, which can be a health disadvantage to the communities involved.

Vegan meal seen from aboveThe report also calls for climate change initiatives to be closely and consistently monitored for their health effects, and for researchers from different disciplines to work together to maximize health benefits.

Professor Sir Andy Haines, co-chair of the report, said: Sectors such as transportation, food, construction and energy need to take health into account when implementing climate change measures to take advantage of these dual benefits.

“Many measures, such as improved access to public transport and energy-efficient housing, can also help reduce health inequality.”

Read the full report,’Healthy Future: Working Together to Mitigate Climate Change and Human Health‘When Public summary Of the findings on the Medical Academy website.

A story based on a press release from the Medical Academy.

Image credit:

Cycling: Lena Ivanova / Shutterstock

Electric vehicle: Scharfsinn / Shutterstock

Vegan Meal: Photographee.eu / Shutterstock

Actions on climate change will improve health and save lives now and in the future.Imperial news

Source link Actions on climate change will improve health and save lives now and in the future.Imperial news

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