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Christopher Stevens Review Last Night’s TV: Bent Bronze Than Scammers

Christopher Stevens reviews last night’s television: the good old days when bent copper was more than scammers

Bent copper: crossing Duties

Evaluation:

No one is more shocked by the injustice of life than a criminal who considers himself a victim. crime.. It’s especially unfair because he can hardly call the police.

I can’t help laughing at the resentment of the little scammer Michael Perry, London Tealeaf in the late 1960s.

He caught the attention of two CID detectives, Robson and Harris. They visited his house a little. There they noticed some innocent items, such as Jamie, that might help safety crackers in his professional abilities.

Perry protested that he did not keep the safe. Robson and Harris agreed he was a good boy and offered to shake hands. When they left, they had Perry’s fingerprints throughout the gelignite mass.

Bent copper: crosses the boundaries of duty.Photo: Former DCS John Simmons

Bent copper: crosses the boundaries of duty.Photo: Former DCS John Simmons

Reinforced steel morals are needed to avoid the feeling that a small torrag has arrived. But Bronze didn’t want to arrest Perry — they intended to blackmail him.

Since then, whatever he put in Nick, he had to share it with the detective. .. .. Or go to jail.

Poor Michael Perry. He would have been better off paying taxes and doing the right job like everyone else in us. Life can be tough.

Bent Coppers: Crossing the Line Of Duty (BBC2), with the help of a reel-to-reel recording that is ironically still astonishing for over 50 years, reveals the next part of his story. I told you again.

In late 1969, Perry complained to several Fleet Street reporters. The reporter hid a tape recorder in the trunk of the car. They recorded hours of conversation with another corrupt detective, John Simmond. “There are more villains in our game than you,” said John Simmond.

Symonds has promised Perry’s immunity as long as he continues to bribe, or “drink,” in the CID Argot. He even offered to provide police muscle for robbery: “You can’t have better insurance.”

Former CID officers and veteran journalists laughed at the story, but the actual colors were provided by footage from a police promotional film at the time. Shots of recruits on the parade ground, lines of uniformed police officers in the cafeteria, and typewriters cluttered in busy station offices had a nostalgic charm.

The haze of nostalgic memories depended on the dirtiest story. As a teenager, even the man who prepared for the theft of an email bag he hadn’t committed was the naivety of the time: the naivety of a jury who undoubtedly believed in himself, his parents, and the forged police. It seems that he was confused. evidence.

Great British Sewing Bee

Evaluation:

The nostalgic haze defines the dominant mood of the Great British Sewing Bee (BBC1). Photo: Joe Lycett, Esme Young, Patrick Grant (from left to right)

The nostalgic haze defines the dominant mood of the Great British Sewing Bee (BBC1). Photo: Joe Lycett, Esme Young, Patrick Grant (from left to right)

One contributor identified a change in the British sea, the arrival of drugs that first brought middle-class children into violation of the law, but it was a program that lacked real insight.

The nostalgic haze defines the dominant mood of the Great British Sewing Bee (BBC1), shot with lace sleeves and flapping hem. From the moment comedian Joe Lycett arrived and threw a pink fur coat to judge Esme Young, it was clear that we were back in a more eye-opening era. Almost the only concession to the nasty reality of 2021 was a bottle of hand disinfectant.

The presenter squirted it and shouted, “The bacteria gave up hope with a spray of Joe Soap.”

The show’s twelve new contestants included a dinner lady with a cat called Jiggy Stardust, a French trumpet player from the Gay Symphony Orchestra, a burlesque dancer, and an entertainment director on a cruise ship.

The Sewing Bee was lightweight, ridiculous, engrossed, and didn’t show up in any more welcoming moments.

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Christopher Stevens Review Last Night’s TV: Bent Bronze Than Scammers

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