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Cow Review-A moving record of Andrea Arnold’s dairy cow life | Andrea Arnold

THe is the first documentary from Andrea Arnold Like some of her fiction movies, she deals with broken mother-daughter bonds. However, the mother in this case is Luma, a Holstein Friesian cow. Daughters (and we meet two) born during Arnold’s four-year production period are rushed tormented by their mothers, who look overly cold, much like much of the life of a dairy cow. It’s a cow. ..

This is certainly not the first movie to point out that industrial agriculture and animal welfare are uneasy companions. Everything from Nikolaus Geyrhalter’s rigorous wide-screen industrial food production tableau Our daily bread (2005) Nominated for Robert Kenner’s Oscar Food, Inc (2008) opens the lid on food production for American companies and claims that the cost of intensive farming is high and is mainly borne by livestock. However, Arnold’s films encourage intimacy and emotional connection to the bovine subject, which is rarely achieved elsewhere.The closest comparison is from Viktor Kosakovskiy Gunda In (2020), he traced the daily life of pigs through well-constructed black-and-white photographs.

Arnold, however, does not want to beautify her subject. The film is shot with hand-held urgency and the lens is placed at breast and eye level. She confronts us with the crushing cycle of dairy cow life, the dull sound of strip lights, and the muddy darkness of milking sheds. Perhaps the most traumatic is the moment of great joy when cows graze on pastures in the spring. Needless to say, 45 minutes before the movie, before we get a glimpse of the grass leaves.

Sure, this is not an easy watch. I cried more or less firmly for the last 30 minutes, but it’s an important watch.

Cow Review-A moving record of Andrea Arnold’s dairy cow life | Andrea Arnold

Source link Cow Review-A moving record of Andrea Arnold’s dairy cow life | Andrea Arnold

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