UK & World

Fast food chain subway warns that it is facing a shortage of “carrots, eggs, cheese” due to Brexit

Fast-food chain subways have warned that they have faced a shortage of “carrots, eggs and cheese” due to supply line disruptions since the end of the Brexit transition.

  • Ingredients missing on some branches include carrots, eggs and cheese
  • Notifications displayed at some branches blamed the lack of “Brexit impact”
  • The subway said the signs were displayed incorrectly and asked the staff to remove them

The Subway branch of the sandwich chain faces a shortage of fresh ingredients due to the following impacts: Brexit‘.

Ingredients that may not be included in the sandwich include carrots, eggs, and cheese, which have shops in Brentwood, Essex. St Helens, Merseyside; Stoke-on-Trent all missing padding, Times reports.

The notifications displayed on the shop doors above are: ‘Because Brexit is influential [the] Food supply, some of our fresh produce may not be available today.

A subway branch that is a sandwich chain faces a shortage of fresh ingredients due to the “Brexit influence”

All franchises were reportedly signed by the chain’s UK headquarters prior to the New Year in anticipation of delays in delivery by Brexit’s bureaucracy.

The owner of one store told the Times that he had been struggling to make sandwiches without carrots, eggs and cheese since Brexit earlier this year, saying “I can’t do anything on the breakfast menu.”

How Border Delays Are Hitting Food Delivery

There are other forms to fill out before the truck arrives at a waterway or other intersection after the UK withdraws from the Customs Union and the Single Market.

And when they arrive at the port, there will be new checks by the authorities and the transportation process will be slowed down.

For UK retailers, that means slower receipt of inventory from the EU. It will take some time for European carriers to arrive here, and UK-based heavy-duty trucks will slow down along the way and even on their return trips.

This leads to a shortage of empty shelves and some merchandise for consumers.

The most pressing issue is with fresh food, food and drink. Liquors such as broccoli, tomatoes and cheese and staple foods are in short supply as they are imported from European manufacturers.

The problem is the same for exporters and UK companies that send goods sold in Europe.

Import problems are the most serious for fresh food. Seafood sold on the European market is disassembled behind heavy trucks due to the time it takes to move. And now the problem is affecting other heavier foods like meat and vegetables that are rotting on the dockside.

Despite this subway, which has sales of over £ 7 billion and 43,000 stores worldwide, the signs were mislabeled and asked staff to remove them, the United Kingdom.

Subway uses IPC Europe, a company owned by Subway, to procure ingredients from the continent.

As the Brexit transition ended on December 31, 2020, McDonald’s also warned of the lack of notifications displayed at the branch office, but later claimed that the signs were incorrectly displayed.

In a poster distributed to restaurants as an emergency measure before a post-Brexit trade deal was agreed on Christmas Eve, McDonald’s blames the “post-Brexit supply challenges” for lettuce and tomatoes that may be lacking in burgers. did.

The posters found by Twitter users in various disciplines said: ‘Due to supply challenges following Brexit, some menus may be unavailable or out of material. Example: lettuce, tomato. Please ask the staff for details.

McDonald’s then told staff that no signs were needed and the chain did not anticipate supply problems related to Brexit and the like.

MailOnline is asking Subway for comment.

Meanwhile, a small British food company is facing difficulties in exporting to the EU, and one boss of a British cheese maker said BBC He was advised to set up in Europe to avoid EU export turmoil.

The Department for International Trade told MailOnline that it was “not a government policy” to advise companies to set up subsidiaries abroad.

However, Simon Spurrell, co-founder of the Macclesfield-based Cheshire Cheese Company, was one of those who claimed to have been told to set up a shop in the EU.

Spurrell reportedly sought advice from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Areas regarding the need for veterinarian-approved health certificates for export.

The company was reportedly required to pay £ 180 for a certificate to export gift boxes up to £ 30 each.

The notices displayed on the doors of some UK subway stores are: 'Because Brexit is influential [the] Food supply, some of our fresh produce may not be available today.

The notices displayed on the doors of some UK subway stores are: ‘Because Brexit is influential [the] Food supply, some of our fresh produce may not be available today.

He told the BBC that he was advised to set up a packaging company throughout the strait.

Spurrell said: “They told me that setting up a fulfillment center in the EU where we can pack boxes is my only solution.”

He added that the company is currently considering “testing water” at a French company, but has abandoned plans to build a new £ 1m warehouse in the UK, hiring up to 30 people. Was able to be created.

Advertising

Fast food chain subway warns that it is facing a shortage of “carrots, eggs, cheese” due to Brexit

Source link Fast food chain subway warns that it is facing a shortage of “carrots, eggs, cheese” due to Brexit

Related Articles

Back to top button