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HSBC warns of an increasing number of scammers pretending to come from banks to steal your money

Banks are urging people to never disclose one-time passcodes (OTPs) as the number of people restricted to sharing this information has increased by 25% in the last six months.

HSBC has issued a new fraud warning

HSBC warns that an increasing number of scammers are fooling customers from security codes to access their money.

Banks are urging people to never disclose one-time passcodes (OTPs) as the number of people restricted to sharing this information has increased by 25% in the last six months.

One-time passcodes may be issued by HSBC or other banks as a security check at the time of purchase.

This requires sending the code to the customer via text message and the user entering it online to complete the transaction.

However, fraudsters call customers and request OTPs, pretending to be from a bank or a trusted organization. You can use it to make fraudulent purchases.



Scammers trick customers into sharing passcodes
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One of HSBC’s customers, known only as Mr. S, received a text that appeared to be from DPD claiming that he was trying to deliver the package.

Ms. S clicked on a link in the text and was sent to a page she felt legitimate.

It asked for her card number, sort code and account number she was told to enter to pay the shipping charges.

Ms. S then received a phone call from someone who believed she was from HSBC and told her that her card was suspected of being used for fraud.

During the call, she was asked to disclose the OTP code to recover the funds-not realizing that it wasn’t really the bank she was talking to.

Have you ever been involved in this kind of scam? Please let us know: mirror.money.saving@mirror.co.uk





Another scam involved a customer named Mr. M who received a text message that appeared to have been sent by Royal Mail to arrange a redelivery.

This was similar to a scam in that the first customer was asked to click the link and enter the card details online.

Just 15 minutes later, Mr. M received a call again requesting an OTP code from someone claiming to be from HSBC.

Approximately one-third (37%) of all successful fraud attempts were at risk of a total of £ 363,300 in the hands of fraudsters, with the possibility of OTP disclosure last month (August).

In June, OTP scams were the most suspected, with a total of over £ 411,408 scams attempted.

David Callington, head of fraud at HSBCUK, said:

“We have an experienced team looking for signs of fraud, but customers can help themselves by recognizing the tactics used by scammers.

“HSBCUK and other banks never ask you to reveal your bank password. If someone suddenly calls you and asks for a one-time passcode, hang up immediately. It’s a scam.”





How to avoid fraud

HSBC has released some tips to help you find scams.

According to banks, OTP-related scams usually start with “smishing” text from what appears to be a legitimate organization.

This message prompts the recipient to enter their personal information online.

If you think your text message is dangerous, don’t reply or click the link.

Instead, you should contact the organization that seems to be the source of the message to see if you actually tried to send the message.

Check your contact details online from a real website instead of calling the suspicious text message number.

HSBC customers will receive an alert with an SMS message containing an OTP instructing them not to share the code with bank staff or even police.

If in doubt, instead of receiving an OTP via SMS, you can choose to confirm your transaction in the HSBC app.

HSBC Protect yourself from scammers On that website.





What to do if you are scammed

If you suspect you are a victim of fraud, you should contact your bank immediately.

If there is a risk of password leakage, you will also need to change your password to prevent fraudsters from continuing to access your account.

Finally, you also need to report the scam Action fraud Please call online or call 03001232040.

Suspicious text messages should be forwarded to action scams for free on 7726.

Or, if you live in Scotland, contact the Scottish Police.



HSBC warns of an increasing number of scammers pretending to come from banks to steal your money

Source link HSBC warns of an increasing number of scammers pretending to come from banks to steal your money

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