Jean Moir: Ordinary people are suffering the most in me-first Britain hit hard by strikes

More Heathrow bombings are imminent and carefully planned to cause maximum disruption to your summer vacation plans.

More stop oil protests will wreak havoc in Central London It will be held in other locations over the next few weeks. More TikTokers are taking to the streets, exploiting cruelty and chaos in pranks that cause humiliation and terror.

More rail strikes and more NHS Strikes are on the menu as junior doctors and nurses demand higher salaries.more DVLA strike? probably. More from civil servants? surely.

More strikes by border guards, bus drivers, teachers, and did I miss anyone?

We are at a major crossroads as more and more unions are planning or are planning strike action in the coming months.

Jean Moire: Ordinary people are the most affected by strikes (Pictured: PCS members in the picket line in May)

Jean Moire: Ordinary people are the most affected by strikes (Pictured: PCS members in the picket line in May)

More Heathrow bombings are imminent and carefully planned to cause maximum disruption to your summer vacation plans.Heathrow airport during pilot strike, shot in 2019

Last year, the UK recorded the highest number of working days lost to industrial unrest in more than 30 years, with some 2.5 million lost to industrial action.

It’s not even July yet, but a long, hot summer of dissatisfaction unfolds before us, and a ribbon of anxiety flutters toward the future.

how did we get here The pandemic, inflation and cost-of-living crisis have all contributed to pushing the country into a corner. House prices have fallen for the first time in more than a decade, but energy prices and poverty levels continue to rise.

Commercial, retail, independent, catering, public sector. Everyone suffers. Even Party Piece went bankrupt with millions of dollars in debt. Few businesses escaped unscathed, even the Middleton family. But external factors and prevailing circumstances matter little to strikers and protesters, disaffected people and pranksters.

These are tough times for serious people. Now is the moment in history when we must come together and get behind the wheel of this country together.

However, if you look around you, you will see that shortsightedness and me-firstism are prevalent. My problem with your comfort, my consolation with your plans going awry, a better life than your desire to send your children to school and your mother to the hospital. My wish for style and clean air.

With yet another strike raging, or Just Stop Oil crippling London, and TikTokers trolling Primark stores on Oxford Street just for laughs, our The reality of the economic situation seems to have not yet permeated.

The government has so far refused to change salaries in the public sector, saying they cannot afford the wage increases demanded, and raising salaries in line with inflation will only exacerbate the problem anyway.

More rail strikes and NHS strikes are planned as junior doctors and nurses demand higher salaries.Photo: Waterloo Station on 7th June

Instead, they are in the process of tightening laws to make it harder for people in key sectors to strike, and I can’t help but support their efforts. Sure, everyone should have a democratic right to strike and protest, but never when it causes others danger, hardship, or continued inconvenience.

Not long ago, an inspirational man rallied a nation by calling on them to do what was right for the greater good.

In his famous 1961 inaugural address, John F. Kennedy said, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.” .

He urged Americans to understand the importance of civic action and public service as a path to prosperity and happiness.

How quaint and old-fashioned it sounds! The very idea that selflessness, not selfishness, could lead to a better world, is unlikely to gain significant traction at the moment in a British company where everyone is vying for a bigger slice of their pie. It is low. It has cream on top. I’d like some cherries, too. And make mine bigger than hers.

Collectively, all this desperate strike action and pious protests are accomplishing is pushing us all further down the drain, trapped in weeds, trapped in mud.

What really fascinates me is that it’s always the ordinary people who suffer the most, not the bosses, the fat cats, the rotten people whose job it is to profit from the pandemic.

It is the hardworking and hard working people who are punished and thwarted again and again.

Those who are just trying to get to work. Those looking to enjoy their hard-earned two weeks at the beach with their families. There are people who have waited months or even years for NHS surgery, only to be denied again and their health deteriorates.

People who pay taxes and respect their communities. When strikers and agitators unleash the latest mayhem upon the public, they are the people who never think, the ones who must bear the brunt of their grievances in silence.

And, even more infuriating, oil protesters and other extremists clinging to highways and roads, or marching slowly through cities, make it possible for the most disadvantaged people to keep themselves safe. It relies on the humanity of

Just as Blanche Dubois relies on the kindness of strangers, they depend on the sympathy of people more civilized than themselves, lest they beat or beat them. It can be very attractive.

But just as public support for the new wave of strikes surging in our summer is fading, so too is this generosity and fraternal understanding rapidly drying up.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-12175565/JAN-MOIR-ordinary-people-suffer-strike-hit-Britain.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490 Jean Moir: Ordinary people are suffering the most in me-first Britain hit hard by strikes

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