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Shield pensioner (81) was tricked into paying £ 200 to a “Covid helper” at his front door

Pensioners were tricked into handing £ 200 to a fraudulent couple who claimed to be part of a Covid support group helping local seniors.

William Grayson was knocked on the door by men and women who claimed to be volunteers to help the elderly in Weston-super-Mare’s hometown.

An 81-year-old volunteer living alone, 40 miles away from his relatives, said the two volunteers kindly offered to shop and do business for him while he was shielded.

They claimed to be local support workers picking up food and necessities on behalf of those who could not leave the house.

With gratitude, he gave the young couple £ 200 cash on two visits for food and household necessities, but neither arrived.

William said it was heartbreaking that criminals would abuse the fact that he was too afraid to leave the house.

“There was a lot of confusion about the blockage. I didn’t even know if I could safely stay in my yard, let alone go to the store,” William said.

Have you become a victim of fraud? Email your story: emma.munbodh@mirror.co.uk

Living alone, William thanked the lucky star when they offered to help the weekly grocery store.

“I saw volunteers helping people in the area in a local newspaper. I thank them for their friendly faces who helped me,” he added.

“By noticing these people, to be honest, I was able to make the dark hours even darker.”

William no longer opens the door to anyone unless he has a pre-arranged visit from someone he knows.

His son has since installed a smart doorbell to photograph people who stop by.

William is one of the tens of thousands of people approached by Covid’s front door scammers in recent months, promising rapid Covid testing, vaccines and vitamins to “defend” Covid-19. ..

Last year’s crime victims totaled £ 18.7 million, according to action fraud figures. That’s despite the ban on front door salesmen until last summer.

And it’s not just used by Covid criminals.

There are many forms of front door scams.

Shield pensioner (81) was tricked into paying £ 200 to a
Front-door scammers spent nearly £ 20m on Britain last year

Mirror Money has been heard from victims targeted by landscape architects, merchants, and even scammers disguised as engineers of reputable businesses-in all cases, they demanded money in advance.

Elsewhere, they claimed to be philanthropic workers to exploit people’s vulnerabilities.

Which is the report of the consumer group? Since the start of the first blockade, 16% of the general public have been found to have received unilateral visits from someone claiming to be a salesperson or a charitable worker.

9% said they felt they were pressured to take certain actions, such as buying or donating.

These unexpected visits can also be disturbing, especially if the elderly, vulnerable people, or salespeople are particularly aggressive.

Which one?He says you should always be careful of people who unexpectedly appear at the door
Which one?He says you should always be careful of people who unexpectedly appear at the door

Lucy, who was renamed, told a group of consumers that she was happy when a landscape architect who offered to clean up the vestibule knocked on the door last July.

She didn’t find it unusual for them to demand money in advance.

“They said they were working in my neighbor’s yard and I thought mine seemed like I could do it with a little TLC. It was fun because I was looking at the new front yard in my neighborhood lately,” she said. Said.

“Recently, I’ve run out of work a bit and thought it wouldn’t hurt to ask. I was really sick of them,” Lucy explained.

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They showed Lucy their business Facebook Pages with over 100 positive reviews.

It seemed like a handy option as she was busy working from home while homeschooling her two kids.

She asked the trader if she could build a deck in the backyard so that the kids had more space to play with the blockade.

They received a £ 2,000 cash deposit from Lucy, smashed the front of the house for a few hours, and then set out to buy supplies. The pair never came back.

Lucy later realized that they weren’t the same traders who worked in their neighbor’s yard. They were opportunistic scammers. Lucy gave up the hope of getting the money back.

She explained: “They said they worked in my neighbor’s yard and I thought mine seemed like I could do it with a little TLC. It was fun because I was looking at the new front yard in my neighborhood lately.”

Cash transactions are also untraceable, making it difficult to track down and bring the perpetrator to justice.

Adam French, which one? Consumer experts said the general public should suspect someone who accidentally knocked on the door.

This includes “professional” visits that you do not arrange yourself, such as water and electricity meter readings and gas engineers.

If you have any safety concerns, we recommend that the police and Trading Standards call 999.

“There is great concern that front door scammers are returning to business and trying to abuse the pandemic as much as possible. We all need to be wary of those who accidentally knock on the door.” Said the French.

“Adopting a comprehensive policy of not buying goods or services offered at the door is a surefire way to prevent potential scammers, but buying something at the door. If you do, you will need to ask the seller for your ID or call the company to verify your identity before making a payment.

“If you encounter a scammer, you should report this to Action Fraud in the UK or call Police Scotland at 101 in Scotland and dial 999 immediately if you have any safety concerns.”

Protect yourself from front door scammers

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  1. Please report immediately
    If you paid for a service or product that was not provided by card, you may be able to get a refund using Section 75 or the chargeback rules.
    If a scammer is tricked into making a bank transfer, the bank may be able to collect or refund money based on any code in the conditional refund model.
  2. Smart devices can stop scammers
    According to trading standards, deterrents like CCTV cameras and “no front door seller” stickers on windows are really effective against scammers.
  3. Check in to vulnerable neighbors
    Check in to seniors, vulnerable neighbors and relatives to see if anyone has recently called and warn you to be wary of fraud.
    Alert patrols and community groups can also help raise awareness of fraud in the area.
  4. I just don’t like it
    Adopt a comprehensive rule of not purchasing products and services offered at the front door.
    This applies to people who call from unexpected people or people who haven’t made a reservation, such as water and electricity meter readings and gas engineers.
  5. If you’re scared, call 999
    If you have any safety concerns, we recommend that the police and Trading Standards call 999.
    This is also true for particularly aggressive traders. It may be justified in circumstances such as enforcement of contractual obligations, but it is prohibited for traders to refuse to leave your property if you request it.



Shield pensioner (81) was tricked into paying £ 200 to a "Covid helper" at his front door

Source link Shield pensioner (81) was tricked into paying £ 200 to a "Covid helper" at his front door

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