Business

The trio, which started the blockade business behind a used bus, hit a £ 1 million milestone

Three best friends, who started a business venture in the midst of a blockade combining life savings, are celebrating the first £ 1m milestone.

Former marketing consultant Jack Shaw, 32, said he was urged to open his own restaurant when he saw a second-hand double-decker bus on the market for £ 4,000.

He said it was a “difficult time” when ideas came to the fore as work was exhausted and concentration was lost.

It was a rewarding investment after Jack shared his ideas with his friend Neil Austin, 37, and gas engineer and professional boxer Joshua Kelly, 26.

Together, they launched the restaurant business burgers, wings and ribs, combining a savings of £ 90,000. This includes £ 46,000 to turn a devastated bus into the first blockade takeaway on the streets of Colchester, Essex.

A £ 4,000 second-hand bus in Clacton, Essex, inspired Jack’s imagination.

Former marketing consultant Jack Shaw, 32, said he was urged to open his own restaurant when he saw a second-hand double-decker bus on the market for £ 4,000.
They spent £ 46,000 of their hard-earned money turning into a mobile kitchen

“The business was built from our personal savings,” Jack told Miller.

“This business has reinvigorated us with motivation and passion. All three of us had something to focus on and put all our efforts into. But it never sleeps. I’ve been challenging at night. “

The company is celebrating its first anniversary this weekend and plans to open a fourth branch in Shoreditch, London within a few weeks.

They are Jema Collins, Orbia Bowen, Alex Bowen, and Tyson fury Among their customers.

But the biggest highlight is that he was selected as the finalist for the National Takeaway Awards, the first chain to compete in the finals in just one year of trading.

Former marketing consultant Jack Shaw, 32, said he was urged to open his own restaurant when he saw a second-hand double-decker bus on the market for £ 4,000.
Launch Night: The first week of the trio was sold out after attracting a large number of people throughout Colchester, Essex.

“At the beginning of the blockade in April 2020, I was searching the internet for various ideas and saw a double-decker bus for sale just above the road in Clacton, Essex.” Jack told Miller.

“Neil and I had previously talked about various opportunities to work together at a startup, but the blockade ran out of work, so we decided to give it a try.

“After annoying the old double-decker bus that had fallen apart, we came up with the idea of ​​turning it into a roadside burger bar,” he said.

“For the next six weeks, with the help of JMS Electrical project manager Marcus Smith, I worked hard to turn a double-decker bus into a commercial kitchen.

Former marketing consultant Jack Shaw, 32, said he was urged to open his own restaurant when he saw a second-hand double-decker bus on the market for £ 4,000.
Trio now wants to challenge central London

“We started marketing ideas on social media. Facebook And Instagram

Jack said that interest exploded rapidly and “sold out a week ago” on the company’s first weekend, June 12-14, 2020.

“From there, the idea became a reality.”

“We are now in four places.

“The restaurant has three walk-ins, one in Colchester, one in Chelmsford in The Garrison, and one in Duke’s Ipswich.

“We are also trying to expand further to Shoreditch and Wembley.”

In just 51 weeks, the trio say their business went from zero to £ 1,032,000 in sales and is now keen to enter central London.

“We expect annual sales to be £ 1,622,000 this year,” said Jack.

Former marketing consultant Jack Shaw, 32, said he was urged to open his own restaurant when he saw a second-hand double-decker bus on the market for £ 4,000.
Jack and Team: He says the success of the chain wouldn’t have existed without their incredible 70 strong workforce.

However, despite surpassing £ 1m in sales, the trio reinvested everything in the business to expand further.

“Everything was not a simple voyage.

“Overnight, I quickly moved from managing another business in marketing to working 70 hours a week in a BWR,” Jack recalled early on.

Gas engineer Neil continues to work full-time around the business, but Josh also fits into the food chain around his sports schedule.

“We’re all messing around. We don’t have a specific job title yet. One day we could do a bin run the next day to help with cooking,” Jack said.

Jack says competition is one of the biggest challenges.

“As we grew up, there was constant competition.

Former marketing consultant Jack Shaw, 32, said he was urged to open his own restaurant when he saw a second-hand double-decker bus on the market for £ 4,000.
They received support from professional boxer Joshua Kelly

“Ironically, one didn’t last that long. We recently took over their store and turned it into the first retail store in the heart of Colchester town.”

He said the food delivery business is a particular threat to High Street.

“It’s difficult to deliver food, especially because of our demand.

“Third-party apps like Just Eat and Deliveroo prioritize McDonald’s, KFC, Nando’s, etc. Finding a solution and management for this was something we had planned better.”

Their next goal is to open a branch office in central London and create their own BWR restaurant with a craft beer brewery.

“Our food is unique where we are. We sell genuine American dirty food,” Jack said.

Former marketing consultant Jack Shaw, 32, said he was urged to open his own restaurant when he saw a second-hand double-decker bus on the market for £ 4,000.
Famous BWR Burger with Dirty French Fries Chain-Fourth Popular Product at Deliveroo, Colchester Last October

“We’re about to join the UK food movement, which shows that independent takeaways are better than things like Five Guy and other grouped takeouts.”

He says the success of the chain wouldn’t have existed without their incredibly strong team of 70 people.

“They are working hard for each other and without them we would be far from today’s place.”

The restaurant business recently acquired its headquarters, which is home to management and accounting teams.

“Opening four locations in an 11-month pandemic without bank support is still a pinch.

“I never imagined I was making hamburgers on a double-decker bus a few years ago.

“It gave me something to focus on the blockage, my mental health could have been really suffering if I didn’t have it.

“It just shows effort and rewards your determination.”



The trio, which started the blockade business behind a used bus, hit a £ 1 million milestone

Source link The trio, which started the blockade business behind a used bus, hit a £ 1 million milestone

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